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Question: the resistance of a 100w light bulb as measured with...

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The resistance of a 100W light bulb, as measured with the DMM, is 9Ω. Household power is 110V. Using a power equation, how much power would you expect the light bulb to use? What’s going on here? Is the light bulb a linear circuit component? If not, what accounts for its nonlinearity? Which power number is right? Why is the other power number wrong?

I used P= V2/R = (110)2/9 = 1,344.44W, but I don't know if I am correct in saying that because as temperature increases, so does the resistance, so in order to drive more current to compensate, you need to apply more voltage. I don't know if that's right, because it would still be linear, and I'm assuming by the way the question was asked, it is not linear. But why?

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