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Question: under what circumstances may a treatment program terminate its agreement...

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Under what circumstances may a treatment program terminate its agreement to restrict disclosure of patient-identifying information?

A program may never terminate an agreement to restrict disclosure of patient-identifying information.
A program may terminate its agreement to restrict disclosure of patient-identifying information only with the client’s written consent except in specific circumstances outlined, such as when information is needed for laboratory services.
A program may terminate its agreement to restrict disclosure only with the written consent of the client.
A program may terminate its agreement to restrict disclosure at any time.

A written consent to disclose form must include all of the following information except:

The name of the person or program permitted to disclose the information
What kind of information is being disclosed
The date, event, or condition upon which consent will expire if not revoked prior to that date
The name and contact information of the clients emergency contact

Joan is being released from jail on the condition that she enter a drug treatment program. She contacts Recovery Center to determine whether she is eligible for their program. They tell her she is not eligible, and she informs her Parole Officer of their decision and looks for services at other facilities. Her parole officer, then contacts Recovery Center and asks whether Joan has actually contacted them. Recovery Center informs Mark that she has. Is this a permissible disclosure?

No, 42 CFR Part 2 protects anyone checking on their eligibility to enter a program following an arrest on a criminal charge.
Yes, 42 CFR Part 2 only protects those who have received treatment from or formally applied to the treatment program.
Yes, there is an exception to the non-disclosure rule where the client is incarcerated.
Yes, because Joan’s parole officer has her implied consent to talk to them.
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